Grey's Anatomy Writer Reflects on "The Time Warp"

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We've talked about last week's episode in depth in our review and Grey's Anatomy Round Table. Now it's time for the writer's take on Seattle Grace drama past and present.

Below are some excerpts from the official writer's blog post authored by Zoanne Clack, the head writer on "The Time Warp," link to her full posting at the bottom ...

RICHARD!

I admit, I have a bit of an obsession with Richard… an addiction, if you will.

He’s always just so suave, always so collected, and always, cool. SO MANY people have asked me what is to become of him now that he’s drinking again. I only hope this episode serves to address at least some of your many concerns about the Chief.

We had always talked about doing a flashback episode, and from day one, Season One, Shonda has emphasized that Richard and Ellis got together at least partially because of the fact that they were the only black and the only woman resident in their class.

Embattled Chief

Being outcasts, they were naturally drawn to each other (and passion did the rest). They were residents in the early 80’s and of course the BIG thing about the early 80’s was that weird new disease they eventually called AIDS.

I think one of the most chilling lines in the episode is when Young Richard says, “They could find a cure for this tomorrow, or next week,” because you know he probably really believed it… and here we sit 18 years later with no cure.

What better case to highlight Richard and Ellis and their irresistible draw to each other. There was nothing that could keep them apart, and a patient like this, who was an outcast himself, could only pull them even closer together.

As one of the crew members put it, what a cool way to tackle racism, sexism, and homophobia in one fell swoop! Side note: It was so fun to recreate 1982! The crew worked SO HARD to make this happen and did an AMAZING job.

How great was it to see the Richard/Ellis dynamic? Ellis was a force to contend with. Shall we say she was … a “maneater?” There were basically two categories that were prevalent among female surgical residents in those days: feminine, or macho.

I’ll give you one guess as to which one Ellis was.

She was a surgeon first and only incidentally female. She put her defenses up against any challenge to the way she thought the world should be, and lashed out when her plan was interrupted. Is it any wonder Meredith ended up so dark and twisty?

But it’s not all about 1982. We also get to see Richard as he became Bailey’s mentor, helping to shape little Mandy Bailey into the Miranda Bailey we see today ... and the Richard we saw in 2006 makes Callie shake in her shoes a little bit.

Follow this link to read the entirety of the writers' blog ...

Steve Marsi is the Managing Editor of TV Fanatic. Follow him on Google+ or email him here.

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Grey's Anatomy Quotes

There's a reason I said I'd be happy alone. It wasn't 'cause I thought I'd be happy alone. It was because I thought if I loved someone and then it fell apart, I might not make it. It's easier to be alone, because what if you learn that you need love and you don't have it? What if you like it and lean on it? What if you shape your life around it and then it falls apart? Can you even survive that kind of pain? Losing love is like organ damage. It's like dying. The only difference is death ends. This? It could go on forever.

Meredith

MEREDITH: "You don't get to call me a whore. When I met you, I thought I had found the person that I was going to spend the rest of my life with. I was done! All the boys and all the bars and all the obvious daddy issues, who cares? I was done. You left me. You chose Addison. I'm all glued back together now. I make no apologies for how I chose to repair what you broke. You don't get to call me a whore."
DEREK: "This thing with us is finished. It's over."
MEREDITH: "Finally."
DEREK: "Yeah, it's done."
MEREDITH: "It is done."