The Killing

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The Killing Review: Taking A Stand

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Don't get me wrong: The Killing, like plenty of shows, has had its share of flaws, including episodes that offer moments of boredom and aspects of melodrama that make you want to yawn.

Except "Bulldog" was a perfect example of a biting force that gripped on with its story and characters and refused to let go.

Perhaps it's because we're on the final stretch of the season, but I've seen plenty of programs waste away their remaining episodes for fluff and utter nonsense. This particular installment did none of that marking pretty much every moment with something rather significant and thoroughly absorbing. And in a way took things we might have predicted and spun them right around.

Sarah in Tears

Stan, a man with a violent past and caring heart, was able to prove his ability to go above being bossed around. Rather than kill someone to protect his family, he simply scared the man off.

And surprise, surprise, Alexi was the guy to pull the trigger and finish of Janek. Stan is in the clear and I'm glad that he was able to stay above that particular path.

I've a feeling that the Janek and mob story is through for the most part now. Did it seem easy to get rid of him right now, under these circumstances? Yes and it certainly wraps up that problem for Stan, but really it showed what type of man Stan is and how he was able to be resilient in the long run.

Richmond broke down and gave his heartfelt speech that will either ruin him politically or turn his voters empathetic, but he too stood above the blackmail. I've wanted him to just reveal his story for the longest time and hope it works out in the long run.

Billy Campbell really emoted the consternation that Richmond was feeling with each word and look in his eye. The man is putting it all out on the table. Richmond was able to overcome his reluctance and get past Mayor Adams demands. The characters on this show really have some dark backgrounds they have to deal with.

Yet, with both of these characters dealing with their own inner demons so to speak, it was Linden and Holder's search for the key card that proved most exciting.

Maybe it's watching the hero take down the bad guy or really sticking it to smug and arrogant people, but they've finally been able to find the proof that would blow the Larsen case wide open.

Certainly Chief Jackson deserved that type of defeat and I loved Holder slapping the warrant in her head of security's face and Linden holding the bloody keycard up the camera and giving a great big grin.

I hope Jackson goes down in flames and she's shown how great an enemy she can be for this show, even if she's probably not the killer.

But even, with their victory on the casino and dodging their own police brethren, it was the final reveal (which I was hoping we might get a peak at) of who the key card belonged to.

Nope. It's not Mayor Adams.

The card belongs to someone in Richmond's camp, most notably Gwen or Jamie.

And while I didn't see that coming, I knew that the campaign was always connected to the murder and would eventually rear its important head again. It's just interesting knowing that its one of Richmond's loyal allies.

There was something utterly exciting about watching Richmond's speech mixed in with Linden and Holder testing the keycard. We are just so close to the end, it's barely touching our outreaching finger tips.

I'm curious to find out why Gwen or Jamie committed the horrible murder, if it is indeed one of them who did it.

This was by far one of the best episodes of the season offering up an exciting and compelling drive towards the end and I'm eagerly awaiting for what the final episodes have to offer. If it can finish out as strong as this hour of television was, then I'll never want the rain to go away from this AMC series.

Review

Editor Rating: 4.8 / 5.0
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User Rating:

Rating: 4.6 / 5.0 (87 Votes)

Sean McKenna is a TV Fanatic Staff Writer. Follow him on Twitter.

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I still have a question from episode 1. They found Stan's VISA card when searching for Rosie and it was never discussed again, unless i missed it. I have always thought this to be relevant. I just finished watching the "Donnie and Marie" episode online and wanted to post this before watching the finale. Looking for any insight here before wrapping this show up. Thx

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I think it is either the current mayor or the guy who is helping with the guy in the chairs in his campaign.Either way it has been too long finding out the culprit.

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I bet it's Jamie. He is secretly gay and was brought to the 10th floor by the male prostitute that was going to bring Holder there. That's where Rosie saw him and he accidentily killed her.

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@Sean: "Alexi was the guy to pull the trigger and finish of [sic] Janek.... I've a feeling that the Janek and mob story is through for the most part now." But there's still the connection between Janek's gang and the mayor, Janek's gang and the prostitution ring with which Rosie was connected. I don't think it's done. @Chip: "The preview for next week already tells us that the card was created for Jamie's gym access, so we can probably rule him out ..." Remember that the mayor's aide goes to the same gym and has a locker near Jamie's. (They exchanged punches in the locker room not too long ago.) @KT: "Linden holding up the keycard? WTF?" Linden completely ignoring police procedure bothered me. I understood her explanation, but not what she hoped to accomplish by screwing around with evidence in a way that could complete blow her case.

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The card probably doesn't belong to anyone we think it might. This show doesn't give clues, it gives blind alleys, dead ends and false positives. Linden showing the key card on the elevator was sophomoric, stupid and totally out of character. And how the hell did anyone miss it at the casino in the first place? The shows grows more lame with each episode. The only thing worth watching is Holder, but that's not enough to make the show viable. The woman running it was given far too long a leash and way too much credit. Especially considering all she did was adapt an already amazing show. TV execs must all be idiots who mistake arrogance and conceit for talent.

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I think Richmond did it. They are playing with us. Ok, he's got an alibi, but who saw him there? Only one person? It mihgt be not true, that he wanted to kill himself.
And it would be some kind of trick, that in the end of the first season they told us Richmond did it, and now it turns out that he was the one.
Maybe he is crazy or something after his wife died?

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LOL @ Chip... You should try coke zero, cos youre obviously on too much sugar baby. Richmond has an alibi, a good one being the fisherman that pulled him from the water. Terry- she was probably with the rick kids dad. And why would she kill a niece that she clearly loved. Mitch- OMG have you been watching the ad breaks only?! Why would an overprotective mum kill her own kid LMAO My guess is Adams offsider with bald head. he probably switched cards etc. Chip- I hope youre not in a security/law/policing employment cos I tell ya what.. you got no hope of solving this one!

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(continued from previous post) in high places. Among these three candidates, I'd judge the order from most likely to least likely to be Richmond, Terry, Mitch.

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(continued from previous note) would not let the murderer's identity be revealed in the preview. And from what we know of her, Gwen is a fearsome, scheming political opponent, but not a murderer. If it's Richmond himself, then all of the suspense evoked in last season's closer was not just a red herring, but real. And that means we have someone who has been presenting a horrific charade of his true character to the people of Seattle. (A further nearly-as-bad possibility is that Richmond gave the order or tacit go-ahead, but left the execution to one or both of his chief operatives.) And then we have an extremely unlikely but even more disturbing possibility: that Mitch murdered her own daughter. She's back in town just in time for the finale, and probably sometime in the next two episodes we'll find out some details of her past with Richmond. A little less disturbing but somewhat more possible alternative is that Terry is the murderer, since she has some connection with friends in high places. Among these three candidates, I'd judge the order from most likely to least likely to be Richmond, Terry, Mitch.

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The Japanese anime character from an early episode this season pointed to the probability of Richmond's campaign still being responsible for the murder, since we were told that character signifies that responsibility lies with the one you suspected at the beginning, but you needed to go around and come back to that character seeing things from a different light. (I mentioned that in my comments on that episode.)I was really surprised by all the comments throughout this season complaining about the focus on Richmond's campaign after he'd been supposedly cleared. It clearly was going to prove important later on, either with relation to Rosie's murder or the second murder mystery Veena Sud said would occur before the end of the season. If it's someone in the campaign, I'd personally bet Richmond himself, not either Gwen or Jamie. The preview for next week already tells us that the card was created for Jamie's gym access, so we can probably rule him out -- I'm betting the creative team would not let the murderer's identity be revealed in the preview. And from what we know of her, Gwen is a fearsome, scheming political opponent, but not a murderer. If it's Richmond himself, then all of the suspense evoked in last season's closer was not just a red herring, but real. And that means we have someone who has been presenting a horrific charade of his true character to the people of Seattle. (A further nearly-as-bad possibility is that Richmond gave the order or tacit go-ahead, but left the execution to one or both of his chief operatives.)