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Perception

Perception Review: Unforgiven

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Sometimes, I wish Perception didn’t need to get so twisty all the time with its reveals as the story of the hour progresses.

I was already invested in Perception Season 3 Episode 3 with the bank robbery (although I was a bit disappointed that the FBI agents dropped their guns) and I was looking forward to watching Daniel and Kate hunt the thieves down.

It was even kind of wild that after easily capturing the sick robber, the duo learned that he could possibly be ill because of eating human flesh. What? Is this going to turn into some Hannibal story?

Truthfully, I don’t think the show would get that dark (and nor should it), but it made me curious as to the ultimate direction of the hour.

So after learning that the one accomplice was killed, and the father - who the FBI asked for help - said he murdered him, I knew he was lying that it was his son.

But the end result that the bank robbers were getting money for the father because they felt bad for lying to him through email, taking his money, and killing his son took one turn... only to have the father turn into a vengeful rage as he killed Mick the Australian trying to make amends.

And on top of that, he was trying to get himself put in prison so he could kill the other robber connected to the death of his son.

I get that he would feel plenty of emotion and be upset after learning the truth, and maybe its plausible that the father would snap so quickly, but it just felt so drastic. He not only quickly shot Mick, but he just so happened to have gasoline to help burn him (at least that shark necklace survived.)

Maybe I didn’t want the father to become the bad guy, and the “bad guys” trying to do the right thing, but it seemed so fast in turnaround that I was having a hard time getting on board with the concept.

However, it was the final flashback sequence as Daniel and Kate coaxed the truth out of the sick robber that was just messed up. There was some talk of surfing and robbing (very Point Break, though we really didn’t get to see that) and then the son was shot, his friends held him down to put him out of his misery and then they ate him.

It just seemed so left field as if to be that last minute shocking twist.

By the end of the case, I really wished we’d gotten to spend more time with Daniel’s father or the boy who was kidnapped, Dillon.

I loved the scene with Dillon speaking with Daniel, asking him about his scarf and if he’s sick or needs a hug. It was such a small moment, with some great facial reactions from Daniel, but it was an endearing one. And I’m glad that he was able to listen to Dillon talk about people asking him what’s wrong with him. It reminded me of Daniel talking about his schizophrenia to the witness in Perception Season 3 Episode 2.

Really, I just wish we had more with Dillon as he was entertaining to watch, especially in his interactions with Daniel. It certainly made for a nice touch to end on with the two playing some music together.

At the same time, I’m glad we got to see Daniel’s father (played by Peter Coyote no less) and watch their tumultuous relationship continue. But to see Daniel decide to try and help his father with his Alzheimer's disease was a big step for him. Sure, Daniel wasn’t able to forgive his father, but he wasn’t going to abandon him. And to get any chance at those character driven moments, especially with Daniel, are a real plus.

I hope we see Daniel’s father again, even if he stormed out at the end.

This hour was definitely about forgiveness, but where I enjoyed some of the character interactions with Daniel, I wasn’t as impressed with the actual case itself. Sure, it pulled a few fast ones, but does it always need to be that way to be entertaining or successful? Not every case has to be so wild and grand.

Still, Perception is certainly made for that summer fare, and I continue to enjoy watching Eric McCormack as Daniel solving crimes and teaching us about the brain. I guess we can only imagine what his next case might be, right?

Should Daniel forgive his father?

 

Review

Editor Rating: 3.5 / 5.0
  • 3.5 / 5.0
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User Rating:

Rating: 4.9 / 5.0 (10 Votes)

Sean McKenna is a TV Fanatic Staff Writer. Follow him on Twitter.

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I agree with your feedback on the case, Sean. I did love the scenes with Dillon. I think that little boy is the same guy who plays the son in Masters of Sex. I also saw him in another show recently. He seems to be a little actor that is getting a lot of parts to play. I love Eric McCormack as Daniel, and I look forward to his cases. He also gives such nuggets of information that I find so interesting. He's like the male version to the Black Box (have you ever watched it)? Or the lead actress is the female version to him. She's bi-polar. Anyhow thanks for the review. I too was sorry that the father became the bad guy. I didn't like that they made him out to be the bad boy, and that the bad guys were the ones trying to be good. I wanted to empathize with the father, but in the end, couldn't really. I know his grief was great, but murder was not the answer. And then pre-meditated murder to get himself into jail so he could kill the next guy. Too, too much.

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