Sue ann

Ashton Kutcher has the advantage of being a grownup. I expect he will show up on time, know his lines, (all of which I read Sheen also did), but additionally, not embarrass the producers, other actors, or fans. I only catch this show in its run as a fill-in show before primetime, but I will make an effort to find out when it is on, and watch it. I liked Sheen in Major League, but he is an idiot, and being a fan of his would make me feel like an idiot, too. Not gonna go there.

Sue ann
The Mentalist Review: Cho Smiles!

Cho is my favorite character on this show -- the rest of them annoy me in one way or another, but Cho is just fascinating. (And very handsome, which does not hurt.) It's good to see him flash that big grin. I also liked the way he punched the banger in the nose and just kept walking. I can always do with more Cho and less Patrick Jane.

Sue ann

@ laura -- What makes you believe the reviewer is Caucasian? Is there a picture somewhere of him? He is right. The writers have deliberately made Priya a bitch. Her brother Raj is the sweetest of the four males, usually, although that was in abeyance last night. But if you remember back to the episode with the cricket they caught and had to take to the entomology department to have it identified, Raj is the one who tried to make Lewis Black's character feel better about the destruction of his career. Sheldon and Howard simply walked out after he answered their question. Raj has often been the peacemaker. And he is the same non-Caucasian that Priya is. It is not logical to assume that the reviewer is being racist. Analyze Priya's character. She is not a nice person. Her skin color is irrelevant.

Sue ann

Everyone who thinks Gibbs should or would become the director of NCIS should remember the one week he was supposed to substitute for Jenny Shepard when she went abroad. He could not stand the job. He is not politically savvy enough to do the job. He will not lower his standards far enough to do the necessary pandering which comes with such a political job. Gibbs will never be the director. Get used to that. His character is one who has found his role in the world, and he is smart enough to not step out of it. It will not happen.

Sue ann
Bones Review: Lime in the Coconut

I'll miss Mr. Nigel Murray. He probably was my favorite squintern. I had been hoping it was Sweets who would get killed. Or Daisy. He was right about three to four on Christmas Eve being the busiest shopping hour of the year. I have done it, at the Spring Hill Mall in West Dundee, IL. It's a nightmare time to shop. So not all of the information is useless. It just is not necessarily relevant to the situation at hand. As he said to Cam last year or the year before, it ties his mind down so that he can use it. I will miss that. As far as the did-they-didn't-they, I don't really care. For me, this show this season jumped the shark. I will continue to watch, but it has gone to irretrievable for me. I just don't care.

Sue ann

I liked the way Castle stuck his chin out and decided to go for it, no matter what. Usually when she pushes him that far, he backs off and shuts up. This time, he didn't. This show often reminds me of the great films of the 1930's, most of which seemed to feature William Powell. Smart, well-acted, well-written character-driven scripts. This show just keeps getting better every season. @ Rick Scheuer -- I would like to discuss the apparent fad this season for killing off major characters in television shows. I watch few of them; of the ones I watch, Bones, NCIS, and Castle all have killed or plan to kill off an important character this week, next week, or both weeks. I gather that a whole lot of the dramas which I do not watch are planning to do the same, based on what I see of the reviews and spoilers here on this web page. What is up with this monkey-see-monkey-do school of television writing? There are other ways to create change in a television series without killing someone. For instance, Castle is going to change if and when Alexis goes to Stanford early. Bones is going to change when Hodgins and Angela have that baby. NCIS changed a bit when Ducky's mother died a natural death of old age, and changed when Gerald was shot by Ari, and had to have physical therapy. Violent death is NOT the only way to create change. I know I am revealing my ignorance, but what is a Buddy/UST show?

Sue ann
NCIS Review: Mike Franks' Swan Song

@ Michael -- Thank you for the correction. Chris Pacci was killed while Kate was still there. This changes nothing regarding the death and devastation which have surrounded Ziva her entire life. I do believe your zeal for pulling apart the posts of other people here causes you to entirely miss their point.

Sue ann
NCIS Review: Mike Franks' Swan Song

@ Maka -- I don't agree that Ziva's emotional breakdown in the elevator was solely to do with the death of Mike Franks. I believe that it was the conclusion of a long series of losses suffered by her character over the course of a violent life, finally taking their toll on her new more open facade. She lost her little sister when they were children. She lost her mother somewhere along the way. She was forced to kill her own brother. She lost her boyfriend when Tony killed him. She lost the co-worker who sat on the other side of her wall. (Sorry, I forget his name.) She lost Jenny, in a way that was partly her own fault. She lost her faith in the righteousness of Mossad and her father's orders, due to the actions she was forced to take on that ship off Somalia. She witnessed the murder of an American serviceman by a Mossad operative. She was taken prisoner by her target, and forced to witness what appeared to be the likely torture and murder of her two friends, DiNozzo and McGee. She has very recently broken up with her boyfriend. She has become estranged from her father. She has lost Mike Franks. The integrity and safety of her place of work has been compromised by the theft of Trent Cort's eye. I am surprised that Ziva David has held together as long as she has. Her strength of character and will power are astonishing. But everyone has a breaking point, a final straw which breaks the camel's back. I think Ziva hit hers, however temporarily, with the death of Mike Franks, who is a symbolic godfather to Gibbs's unit, the final resource who comes to the rescue when things get so hairy that they need the figurative cavalry. At one time or another, everyone needs a hug. It does not mean that a person is permanently broken, or cannot go on, no matter what they say at the moment. It means that they have had so much to handle that they need a little support from a warm pair of arms, and someone to lean on for a moment. I think that this moment came for all four of Gibbs's subordinates, and it was lovely that they were there to hold and support each other physically, the way that they so often support each other professionally and emotionally. Ziva will recover. She just needed a hug, a chance to breathe.

Sue ann
Who Will Die on Bones This Week?

@ Olivia -- Where did you learn that Hart Hanson says that the character who dies has been with the series since the first episode? Only six characters were in the first episode, and remain with the series today, one way or another. Bones, Booth, Angela, Hodgins, Zack (still institutionalized), and Dr. Goodman, who theoretically still remains on sabbatical. Killing Dr. Goodman would be a reach. Who would care? Killing Zack is unreasonable. How did he get out? Killing Booth or Bones would be insane. The show would die with the character. Killing Angela or Hodgins would be needessly cruel, and very detrimental to the chemistry going on in the lab. So, where did you hear that it was to be a character remaining from the pilot episode? I am very curious.

Sue ann
Criminal Minds Review: "Big Sea"

@ cortneyrainey -- Morgan told his aunt that the serial killer had picked her daughter's picture out. This was a lie. He had not recognized her, although he tried to fool Morgan into believing that he did. Morgan knew better. Morgan lied to his aunt to give her some closure so that she could go on with her life; they had established early in the episode that his aunt was slowly dying from not knowing what happened to her child.