Help please?

^I'm so sorry, but I tried very hard to make it clear, but I'm on my Blackberry, not on a computer. :( It absolutely refused to put gaps inbetween paragraphs. @Hookified I agree, and I think BN was right. Its pure slut shaming to the point of sounding like an idiot.
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Help please?

Here's an excerpt from a conversation I had on a forum. The blatant double standard. PoohBear wrote: Whether Katherine truly loves the brothers is not really all that clear. Katherine is a liar and can't be trusted. I don't think Katherine can selflessly love anybody at this point in the series. She loves herself too much, which is why I say her loving Stefan and/or Damon is pointless because she would sacrifice them in a minute to protect herself. She only helps them occasionally and when it meets her needs. She helped Damon with the wolf bite in season 2 but it kind of met her needs because Damon would stay alive and be with Elena. Katherine knew that Stefan would be away with Klaus and she would have a chance to get to him and maybe even win him over. She did the same thing when Stefan was released from Klaus's compulsion. She pushed him to get revenge which pushed Stefan further from Damon and Elena. Katherine is in constant competition with Elena for Stefan's affections. To her, it's more of a game. But in the end, Katherine loves herself above all else. My response; Katherine gave up her freedom for the brothers. She's been on the run, plotting, scheming living in fear for 500 years. She had a chance to be free and she gave it all up for the brothers. There was nothing for her to gain from that. It is no longer arguable that Katherine does not love the brothers. She does. "Katherine has two true loves. If she’ll really admit it to herself and open herself up to it, she’ll find that she truly loves both Salvatore men. Damon and Stefan are part of her history, creation and the fabric of everything she is." - Kevin Williamson PoohBear I don't think Katherine is capable of being in a relationship. She is all about herself and relationships are all about the give and take and the compromise. Katherine isn't capable of that. Damon wasn't either in the beginning of the series, but he's getting better at it and is still evolving. My response: If Damon is capable of it, why can't Katherine? Why can't Katherine be forgiven? Why can't Katherine evolve? Katherine has not been fully explored at present as a character. We do however have an idea of who Katherine is, based on the tiny glimpses. Her history is a vicious, brutal and emotionally/psychologically traumatic one. She's unhinged by it. Her biggest motive is survival. Protecting herself from any and all weaknesses, love being the biggest one. "I didn't let love get in the way" If Katherine would have the courage to let herself love, and let go of the severely traumatic events of her past, they could actually make each other incredibly happy. Katherine told Damon she never loved him. Damon's killed Elena's brother. If Damon can be forgiven for his crimes, so can Katherine. Everyone on the show seems to get a reprieve. Look at Klaroline. After that paring, anything goes. PoohBear: I don't agree. I think Katherine only cares about herself. Damon doesn't really care either way about Katherine. To him. Damon knows he can use Katherine to his advantage because they often have the same goals in mind. That's it. I am pretty positive that the only home Damon has is in Elena at this point. Damon will never love Katherine again. Can't say that I blame him. To put Katherine and Damon together again after all that she has done to him is an injustice to Damon's character in my opinion. Kat ruined Damon's life. I honestly don't know how anybody could forgive something like that. At this point I realized this person did not care about logic or fact and stopped replying. We were going around in circles and she still hadn't answered my question. Why do Damon and every other bad male character on the show get passes and Kat doesn't? This person was also a Klaroline shipper. Bad boys get away with it. Bad girl's die.
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Help please?

@VeevyTayt. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo is actually quite literally on my to-read pile. I don't know why I haven't read it yet. I will now.
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I guess perhaps women are drawn to these characters as a form of wish fulfillment? Self-insertion? I mean what else could drive a middle aged woman to fantasize about Bella and Edward screwing? Or daydream about a teenage vampire boy? "@KatherinePierce...(woah, your name's quite long) i read the host a few months ago, just out of curiosity, and man... that is just ... wow. i haven't read everything, but the parts i read were: 1. heroine cries. 2. love interest hits her and tries to kill her. 3. other love interest literally slams her onto the bed and is all "but wat bout mehh?" (idek what the fuck they were talking about, but the chick was crying again, man)" Lol! My name's Sam actually. There's also this thing with jealousy and possessiveness. I think its cute. Really I do. It can even be funny and swoon worthy...to a point. Its like with these popular authors there's a disturbing level of craving to be needed and desired. Staring outside someone's window while they sleep? Ick. Slamming someone onto the bed (I'm guessing its because they are jealous of other lover?) Ew. And these girls don't even call them to order! And also, where are the jealous heroines? How often does a girl mark her territory with a guy? We all know you have to do that in real life sometimes. When you gotta give that sleazy bitch who's flaunting themselves at your partner that "don't even" look. Where's that? Possessiveness and jealousy is only a masculine trait apparently. Or perhaps a good heroine is above that.
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^Which I suppose is the case with TVD. Some people love Katherine cuz she's the anti-Elena. She eschews the rules set to not only women but to everyone in general. She's dominant, she's bold and very boastful of her sexuality, she's a straight up narcissist. All these traits are only considered attractive when a male lead has them while the heroine blushes and trembles uncontrollably like an epileptic flamingo. It really is tragic when the paragon of an ideal heroine is Anastasia Steele. The dunce can barely walk a straight line, and refers to her vagina as "down there".
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@Elena.Winchester, you're amazing, thank you! I will definitely look all of your suggestions up. I'm really grateful, you have no idea. In the vampire diaries, bad girls don't last. They die or disappear, while the bad boys get love interests. I used to read romance novels from an author who only had virginal heroines. When questioned about it, she said this: " It is unfortunate that most romance writers are not "allowed" to create a fuller spectrum of female characters. As I look back over the heroines I have created over the years, I can see that the sweeter, younger, loopier, more likeable female protagonists usually sell better. Virgins are liked better than experienced women. Sweet, spirited klutzes are far more popular than smart, tormented heroines. I'm generalizing, of course, but if you look at the genre as a whole, I think you'll agree. We forgive a hero for being arrogant and angry--we just call him an alpha, or a "classic" hero. But how flawed can a heroine be?" You know what the most ironic thing is, some of the most mysoginistic viewers/readers I have ever seen are women.
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^IKR? I mean its like only one female exists in literature: A good girl. All women are feminine, they are caring, they want children, they are sensitive, they have very little sexual experience and can heal the world with femininity and overwhelming maternal instincts. The moral ambiguity, the power, the sexuality, the real personal journey is all left to the guys. I know being dominated is a common fantasy among women. Its also mine. I'm not denying its appeal, but for once can a hero meet his match? I also like Antony and Cleopatra. The little that I know of them anyway. Scarlett O'Hara is my favourite heroine in literature because I find some of her characteristics relatable. I don't like children either.
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Help please?

Couples like Rhett and Scarlett or Damon and Katherine and definitely Catherine and Heathcliff appeal to me a great deal. Heroines are often innocent and lost, looking for a powerful virile sex god with issues so that they can heal them. Then her life's purpose is fulfilled. Elena, Ana, Bella, Jane Eyre, Sookie Stackhouse, and on and on and on, all follow the same trope. Other than that, they have no complexity.
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Help please?

A few months ago I wrote an article on Fanpop on Damon and Katherine and how I believe they break conventional romance tropes and certain gender roles. Do you know of any other couples, preferably in books, who are as I specified in the article? Here it is: www.fanpop.com/clubs/damon-and-katherine/articles/186093/title/damon-katherine-breaking-relationship-tropes-undermining-gender-roles If you don't want to read the article, I'm basically just asking for a book where the heroine and hero are equal and the heroine does not simply exist to save the hero from himself with her purity and her virtuous vagina. A real woman with flaws. An anti-heroine, if you will. Help please?
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OT: Teen Wolf

As for Stiles, I love him and think he's a great character, who the fandom misinterprets sometimes. Scott is the hero that cares about everyone. Stiles is the realistic one that sifts through the list of people he cares about. Scott is the moral one. Stiles is somewhat morally flexible. I don't think he tries to portray himself as pure-hearted either. The fandom just sees him that way. His rant to Lydia was veeeeery selfish. He didn't think about it from her POV. She loves Jackass and wanted to save him, no matter what danger that posed onto her. Lydia's IDC attitude about her safety disturbed him. I think he meant that she's not thinking about what would happen to other people if she'd get hurt or die. His anger at being beaten up, used as a punching back to get to Scott, his mother's death (which we are constantly reminded of how deeply it affected him), all boiled up into that one moment. He snapped. It was a moment of weakness he instantly regretted. I don't hold that against him.
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