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Cheshana Marshall

QFT rules.
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11 Comments

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Great way of phrasing it Nancy! The entire season felt "wobbly," like they were just wrapping up loose ends rather than building to a grand exit. Hence the hokey send-off with a weak reboot promise (Abel twisting the Son's ring on his finger). Ick. I'm not looking to start a debate, but it had the opposite effect of Breaking Bad, which did keep a tight storyline throughout the tragedy. It's ironic, since most viewers knew SoA was based on Hamlet, so the expectation was there. :-/

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The finale did feel forced to me, in terms of social commentary and Jax's final ride: "Look, our MC is brown, black, LGBT friendly and we'll kill anyone who doesn't embrace those standards!" Is that supposed to be an analogy for the U.S. internal struggles along with its place in the world market, particularly China, ha, ha? "Look, our porn business doesn't just exploit women, we have a woman behind the camera!" "Look, I've learned that you can't let your mother or wife blind you to justice in our world!" Plus the setup for Jax's exit felt contrived and melodramatic.. A troop of police/highway patrol cars pacing one guy on a motorcycle? You could see it grow from one car to a large force, but no one speeds ahead or has someone cut him off at a pass? It takes a 18-wheeler to do so? And the truck driver doesn't hear anything over the wire or audibly that gives him warning something's around the corner? I'm not buying it... :-/

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Marc Pickering did a GREAT job as the young sheriff Enoch Thompson. I was actually looking to see if it was some kind of surreal makeup/digital editing job on Steve Buscemi. Some may call it an impression, but he embraced Enoch Johnson just as much. I found myself -clapping- at the end of the episode, when Nucky was taking his last drink. I can't remember the last time I felt that moved by any recorded presentation, film/TV/otherwise. Excellent! This as a drama takes creative license with history yet we can see it still points towards the downfall of Al Capone, Enoch Johnson, parts of the Sicilian Mafia and Harlem organized crime. All against the backdrop of Prohibition, Women's Suffrage, the Roaring 20's and the Great Depression. Though they skip over 7 years, they're doing a decent job thus far of wrapping up all these characters' downfalls and/or transitions. But many of the females' stories feel like they are red herrings, a twisted "Who Killed Laura Palmer?" What relevance do they truly have to the overall drama beyond an object to be either rescued, exploited or a bother to the men? The actresses and characters are interesting, yet how they fit into the overall plot leaves something to be desired. Even with that Boardwalk Empire is one of the best dramas on television at the moment. Cheers!