Leslie Knope: (Nervously) My mom's here.. My mom's here.. my mom's here..
(stares at the fire alarm)
Leslie Knope: No, I can't do that. That's illegal.

I'm going to see my mom. She's a big mucky-muck in the county school system. She's my hero. How do I explain her? She's as repected as Mother Theresa; she's as powerful as Stalin and she's as beautiful as Margaret Thatcher.

Sir? This is a childrens slide. You're not allowed to sleep here.

These people are members of the community that care about where they live. So what hear when I'm being yelled at is people caring ... loudly at me.

Well, if you want something done in this town, you call Mark Brendanawicz because he's a city planner, but he's more than that. He's kind of a fixer. He fixes things. He's a smart, capable guy. He just .... he knows where the bodies are buried.

Leslie Knope: So this was built in 1935. It's called Pioneer Hall. And a little trivia: it is one of the first structures in America to ever have locks.

This is where the rubber of government meets the road of actual human beings.

Leslie Knope: Dream with me for a second, Ann: doesn't this neighborhood deserve a first class park? Imagine a shiny new playground with a jungle gym; and swings; pool; tennis courts; volleyball courts; raquetball courts; basketball courts; regulation football field; we can put an ampitheater with 'Shakespeare in the Park'...
Ann Perkins: It's really not that big of a pit.
Leslie Knope: We can do some of those things.

(singing while drunk) Soul Sister, Soul Sister, better get that dough sister! Sweet Lady Marmalarde.

This could be my Hoover Dam.