Kristen: Why is he here? Are you guys coroners?
Cameron: No. He's here to share his memories with us.
Kirsten: But he's dead.
Cameron: Hmm. Fun fact: After death, consciousness lingers for 30 seconds. After that, 10 minutes and the brain starts to degrade. If we get a sample in here fast enough, we can start a protocol that will slow down further deterioration for days.
Kirsten: Sample? You mean corpse?
Cameron: Tomato/Tamato.
Kirsten: You're getting this guys dead, deteriorating brain to talk to you? How?
Cameron: By inserting a living consciousness into those memories. We call it stitching.
Kirsten: That's impossible.
Cameron: Is that so, doctor I've never studied neuroscience unlike Cameron. The brain is a bioelectrical device with emphasis on electrical. Even after death the wiring, the synapses are all still in there, for a while anyway, and that means so are the memories, but it takes a living consciousness to access them and interpret them and that's where you come in.


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Episode:
Stitchers Season 1 Episode 1: "A Stitch in Time"
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Stitchers
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Stitchers Season 1 Episode 1 Quotes, Stitchers Quotes
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Stitchers Season 1 Episode 1 Quotes

Kristen: Why is he here? Are you guys coroners?
Cameron: No. He's here to share his memories with us.
Kirsten: But he's dead.
Cameron: Hmm. Fun fact: After death, consciousness lingers for 30 seconds. After that, 10 minutes and the brain starts to degrade. If we get a sample in here fast enough, we can start a protocol that will slow down further deterioration for days.
Kirsten: Sample? You mean corpse?
Cameron: Tomato/Tamato.
Kirsten: You're getting this guys dead, deteriorating brain to talk to you? How?
Cameron: By inserting a living consciousness into those memories. We call it stitching.
Kirsten: That's impossible.
Cameron: Is that so, doctor I've never studied neuroscience unlike Cameron. The brain is a bioelectrical device with emphasis on electrical. Even after death the wiring, the synapses are all still in there, for a while anyway, and that means so are the memories, but it takes a living consciousness to access them and interpret them and that's where you come in.

Kirsten: how long have I been in this room?
Maggie: Answer the question.
Kirsten: I'm trying to. How long have I been in this room?
Maggie: Guess.
Kirsten: An hour?
Maggie: One minute. [smiling and leaning in] You really don't know, do you?
Kirsten: I have this condition, it's called temporal dysplasia. I have no time perception.
Maggie: I've read about this condition. I thought it was made up.
Kirsten: I wish, cause then you could unmake it up; it really sucks. I use memory, logic and math to approximate time difference, but I don't know what time feels like.