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Rating: 4.9 / 5.0 (9 Votes)
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Recap

An early morning pile up floods the ED, which is short of staff and supplies due to white out conditions in the city. Latham and Rhodes are put in charge of triage, where Latham's autism has an unexpected benefit. Choi resents being told to make his burn patient comfortable and move on, but eventually has to concede that resources are needed else where and has to call COD before his patient's wife arrives. Nat and Will treat two young cousins who both need blood transfusions -- but the ED only has enough O- for one of the them. The mother/aunt is given a horrific choice, and eventually the doctors step in to relieve her of the burden, giving the available blood to her nephew. Her husband is outraged when he wakes from surgery and finds out what has happened. After far too long, Natalie finally does the sensible thing and starts a blood drive, but the lab hasn't had time to clear any of the universal donors they've id-ed. Choi points out that he has regular blood screenings, and the mother consents to a direct transfusion, saving her son's life. Connor admires how Latham is able to make decisions during the crisis without being bogged down in emotion, realizing that his "disability" is not always an impairment. Sarah enjoys being back in the ED. After possibly missing signs of a an amniotic embolism in a patient which contributes to the blood shortage, Wheeler solicits Sarah for klonopin, saying he's not sure that the ED is the right fit for him. Doc Charles is taken on a rollercoaster of emotion when an annoying, drug seeking patient calls in to report his own death only to show up at Gaffney and be put on a 72 hr hold but the head of psych.

Show:
Chicago Med
Season:
Episode Number:
14

Chicago Med Season 2 Episode 14 Quotes

Daniel: Mr. Kellogg. I am so grateful that you're still alive. And that I get to treat you.
Kellogg: I just want my meds!
Daniel: Yeah. It doesn't really work that way.

Dr. Rhodes, one can lack empathy but still feel compassion.

Latham