Dreamrose

I wonder if Chavez might work for a rival Royal family - we haven't really met any of them yet, after all, and it's well past time for them to start sticking their noses into the strange happenings in Portland and with Renard's family. For what it's worth, per dictionary.com: aurochs, "1760-70; < German, variant (now obsolete) of Auerochs, Middle High German ūrochse, Old High German ūrohso, equivalent to ūr (cognate with Old English ūr bison) + ohso ox" ... so Heftigauroch would come to "fierce ox". More or less. For language lessons, in any event, "Grimm" is *not* a good teacher! :-D Kingston was working with Clay's mom to turn Clay into a star boxer. Kingston could stand to become very, very rich if the fighter he was promoting made it big, and the mother clearly had her own monetary ambitions as well. The tell-tale puncture wounds to the chests of both Abe and Bobby Moore indicate that Kingston, the Schinderdiv with the chin spikes, was the killer. Speaking of the Schinderdiv, why did our heroes keep insisting on attacking him hand-to-hand in that fight near the end? You're cops! With guns! The guy is trying to kill you! Just *shoot* him! It would've made a bit more sense (and been pretty funny, too) to have an Indiana Jones moment where Kingston woges all aggressively, charges at them, and promptly gets shot by a very tired Nick Burkhardt who is just so *over* hyper-testosteroned Wesen.

Dreamrose

I enjoy "Forever" - Ioan Gruffudd actually caught my eye initially (I remember him from waaaay back when he did "Horatio Hornblower") and then there was Judd Hirsch, too, who raises the quality of pretty much everything he's in. Tuesday is a rough night, with a ton of popular shows, so I raise my glass that they earned themselves a back nine.

Dreamrose

I loved the look on Merlyn's face when he saw Thea and Ollie hanging out together in Thea's loft at the end. Frustration, with a twist of lemon! He knows that Ollie's the Arrow, and that Oliver hates him. Of course, Oliver's protection was the only reason Merlyn's still alive, since Nyssa thought that Merlyn killed Sara. Do we believe that Roy killed Sara? I see a few possibilities here: Roy is just having a bad dream (ha!); Roy knowingly murdered Sara for reasons yet to be revealed; someone used some sort of mind-control on Roy and used him to kill Sara, and his subconscious mind is trying to tell him the truth. If it comes down to the latter two scenarios, we have to take a look at motive. Why would Roy (or an unidentified third party) target Sara? I think that it's entirely possible that Ra's al Ghul used Roy as a tool to eliminate his daughter's disreputable lover, as Malcolm suggested. Ra's no doubt saw Sara as a bad influence on Talia. Anyone remember on "Babylon 5" how Mr. Morden arranged the murder of Adira, the one woman Londo Mollari actually loved, in order to manipulate Londo into coming back to Morden? Finally, I see a great deal in common with Felicity and another fictional computer geek now wearing a white hat: Penelope Garcia on "Criminal Minds". Watch Season 9 Episode 12, "The Black Queen" and you'll see exactly what I mean.

Dreamrose

I think Elizabeth is a fine addition to the series and lends insight into Renard. Remember, this is the Hexenbiest who carried the bastard son of a Royal and kept both herself and her son alive to tell the tale! "Formidable" can't even begin to describe this woman.

Dreamrose

I haven't heard any rumblings about Juliette and Nick breaking up. That said, if Juliette is so set on having a "normal" life, she should break up with Nick and find someone normal. Nick's never going to have a normal life, after all. His Wesen problems aren't going to vanish into the aether now that he can't see them anymore! Juliette, if you love Nick and truly want to spend your life with him, you should accept him as he is, and not pine for what you want him to be.

Dreamrose

Did you notice that Trubel slept really well that night? I think the memory-eater sucked her nightmares right out of her head. How unintentionally helpful of him! Whatever faction the Steinadler is working for, she certainly seems pretty ominous. Kidnapping is generally not an approved way to get on someone's good side, after all. Can you just see Renard's and Nick's mothers hanging out, drinking tea, and generally being awesome together? They'd have to get past the whole "I'm a Grimm, you're a Hexenbiest" bit first, but once they did, no one would be able to stop them!

Dreamrose

I don't think Ward's escape was intentional on Coulson's part. Rather cold towards the unfortunate men who were guarding Ward, after all. That said, I really don't think Coulson will be all that *surprised* to hear about Ward's escape.

Dreamrose

I can see the similarities between the characters, but then again "quirky technical/science expert" is a fairly common character trope.

Dreamrose

I love it when Lionel gets to be awesome. He and John make a great team, though I admit I'm a sucker for Lionel-Shaw scenes. Those two are absolutely priceless together! I, too, am a fan of Enrico Colantoni. We hadn't seen much of Elias in a while, given how focused the team was on Samaritan, so it's nice to have him back again!

Dreamrose

Heh, Dominic has absolutely *no* clue what he is doing when he throws down the gauntlet with Elias. Elias's apparent arrogance comes from knowledge, experience, will, and the means to back them up. Compared to Elias, Dominic is a sad little upstart with a few big guns. He gets into an actual fight with Elias, it won't be Elias that is found floating in the river. And I completely agree that Enrico Colantoni is awesome! Harold's mission in Hong Kong was well-played! The Machine is fighting back against Samaritan, albeit surreptitiously. I suspect we'll have to wait for the season finale to see how all the threads will come together. Walter was enjoyable, especially since he correctly made the connection between Detective John Riley and his hero, the Man in the Suit. It was probably good that Walter gave up his "Detective Forge" identity, however, since he experienced first-hand how dangerous things actually are for the Man in the Suit and his colleagues.