Frank-lee-meidere

Yeah, let's not be so hard on Frank. (We could make that, like, a motto or something.)

Frank-lee-meidere

Okay, here goes. I'm going to say that the clincher is #3, but I'd been getting suspicious before then. And point 4 helps seal the deal. And if I'm wrong, I promise both a song and a dance (or wait -- is that maybe what I'm doing already?) -- My Theory, Which Is Mine -- Consider first what has happened up to the point we see Jane in the guarded room. He has set up a complicated scheme to romance Lisbon -- and it fails spectacularly. HIs timing his off, his awareness is off. He is stumbling through this, but is unaware of the extent to which he has lost control until it's brought home to him with a glass of water to the face. His appearance, which is always dapper, begins to get scruffy around the edges. Getting to the plane he manages to injure his ankle. So by the time we see him in the guard room, Jane is something of a mess. He has cried, he is injured, he is not in control the way he always is. Lisbon's departure has completely undermined his carefully-controlled mental state. Let's not forget that not too long ago he went through a days-long hallucination in which his wife and daughter were still alive. In other words, his mental state is not as solid as he, or those around him, want to believe it is. And now his anchor has gone, and his plan to keep her has failed. So what I'm saying is that a grand-scale hallucination would not be at all out of character for him. There is precedence. Okay? Now for the evidence, most of which I've already given, but I give now in a more orderly fashion. (1) The guard (or whoever he is) leaves Jane at the table and goes through the door into his "office" behind the window. We can see there is nobody in his office. Only seconds later Lisbon appears, having come from the same direction the guard left -- therefore coming through the office. (I think there is only one door to the room, but can't prove it by what we see. Certainly, however, there's only the one door where she comes from.) There is no interaction between Lisbon and the guard. I want to stress this point. Despite the fact that her visit would require permission, and the guard would have had to let her in, there is no exchange between them, even something like, "You've only got five minutes." (2) During the entire conversation between Jane and Lisbon the guard doesn't look up once. He shows absolutely no interest. He's just ushered an FBI agent into the room with a detainee, who is also connected with the FBI, and he is so uninterested that he doesn't look up even once during their conversation? (3) Here is a big one: When Jane asks, "What about Pike?" Lisbon's answer is a light-hearted, "He'll understand." Really? "He'll understand"? THIS is what she says after having made an emotional phone call to him only hours earlier accepting his proposal? "He'll understand"? There's no WAY he will understand. Nobody, much less Lisbon who is sensitive to other people's feelings, would so lightly brush off the potential devastation she's about to inflict upon her fiance by telling him that she's calling off their engagement only hours after emotionally telling him that she accepts his proposal. If this were really happening, Lisbon would have said something along the lines of, "It's going to be difficult, but he's going to have to understand." Her saying "He'll understand" smacks strongly of wish-fulfillment on Jane's part. If, by chance, it turns out that all this isn't an hallucination, then I hold that this is one of the most badly-written lines in the entire series - and Heller isn't prone to lines that badly-written. (4) When Jane leans over the table to kiss Lisbon the guard reacts by banging on the window and saying, "Stop that!" Why? There's a detainee and an FBI agent in the room. And the detainee is himself affiliated with the FBI. If a couple of FBI agents want to kiss, why should a lowly guard start banging on the window telling them to stop? He might look surprised, but there's no reason for him to interfere. On the other hand, if we accept the hypothesis that Lisbon is not really there, the guard would be completely unaware that anything odd was going on. Jane is talking quietly and not moving much aside from normal shifting in his chair. If, then, the detainee were to suddenly get up, lean across the table, and put his hand out in a most unnerving and peculiar fashion, it would be quite understandable for the guard to start banging on the window and telling him to stop that. So there you have it. My evidence, such as it is. If I'm wrong I will come back and sing the Hippopotamus Song. I will admit my error and I will vow never to attempt interpreting TV shows ever, ever again (until the next time) But if I'm right I expect accolades and much admiration. Possibly chocolates, too. Yes, definitely chocolates. Nothing with coconut, though. I hate coconut.

Frank-lee-meidere

Okay, I'm going to back down on the Red John thing. It's a suspicion I had, but there's admittedly been nothing to back it up since. About the kiss being an hallucination, though, I'm prepared to defend my position with great determination, and indeed have now done so in reply to your previous comment. Which is right below here. Down
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Frank-lee-meidere

It's a cliffhanger because it's an hallucination, I'm telling you. Furthermore, the Red John story is not over. Red John is a woman and we saw her get away through the graveyard.

Frank-lee-meidere

You sound very confident that I'm wrong -- but we'll see. I should have stipulated a forfeit from others if I'm right. Any suggestions?

Frank-lee-meidere

I hate to be the wet blanket here, but I don't buy it for a moment. When the guard walks out of the room there is nobody in the booth where he goes. A moment later Lisbon walks out of the booth (there's only the one door in the room -- at least there's only the one door in the direction from which she comes). During the entire conversation between her and Jane the guard doesn't look up once. Can he really be that uninterested in why an FBI agent has asked permission to speak to the detainee? And then there's the matter of Lisbon's flippant reaction to the matter of Pike. "He'll understand," she says, with a shrug. Considering that only a couple of hours previously she'd phoned him with a very emotional "Yes" to his proposal, her reaction seems highly unlikely I'm almost 100% positive that Jane has had a breakdown and is hallucinating the whole thing. To seal this belief is the fact that the only time the guard shows any interest in what's going on in the room is when Jane leans over the table to kiss Lisbon, at which point he bangs on the window and says, "Hey, quit that!" Which he would do if he's seen his prisoner (or detainee) leaning across the table for no discernable reason. It's a hallucination, folks. I'm positive. And if I'm wrong, I'll come back here and sing the entire Flanders and Swann's Hippopotamus song.

Frank-lee-meidere
Bones Review: Outbreak

Stopped watching last season because the characters had long ago dropped from three dimensional to one dimensional and were threatening to become a singularity. Caught a couple of episodes this season, one with the baby biting (singularity seemed imminent) and this one. This one really wasn't bad. Kind of reminded me why I'd started watching in the first place. At least Bones wasn't acting like a pre-teen's idea of an intelligent person.

Frank-lee-meidere
Castle Review: Depending on Dad

Captain Malcolm Reynolds is back! It was an excellent episode, but it did make me long for the days of Firefly. But we have Castle now, and that's a pretty good replacement (well -- you know.) I did like the fact that Castle did nothing that wasn't beyond his capabilities. He didn't turn into a super spy able to take out a gang of villains with a few well-placed karate chops. His fighting essentially consisted of knocking one guy out of the way in his desperate flight from the house. I was also concerned that the "plan" to blow up the electrical conduit seemed way too simplistic and was relieved to discover that it was just a decoy plan for the real one. As one commenter mentioned, however, I was somewhat distracted by the fact that Alexis had no place to go to the washroom -- although I suppose they let her out and escorted her to the appropriate facilities when she needed them. In that case, however, holding her in a cage in the middle of the room seemed a bit overly dramatic. PS: If they ever make a Clancy movie about John Clark, James Brolin is the man for the part. And hi, Sue Ann. Good to see you still here.

Frank-lee-meidere

Just a correction. Wash didn't play with the dinosaur figures in the opening of the movie, Serenity. He played with them in the first episode of Firefly (an episode called "Serenity"), and it wasn't at the beginning, but after the opening scenes in which we see Reynolds' troops decimated in the iconic battle at the Valley of Serenity.

Frank-lee-meidere
NCIS Review: A Slow Burner

It has its ups and downs, but NCIS is still one of the most solid shows out there, and episodes like this are the reason why. Good job, guys.

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