Sandra Oh News

Sandra was born July 20, 1971, in Nepean, Ontario, a suburb of Ottawa. She is of Korean descent. Her interest in performing began at an early age as a ballet dancer, then later an actor, while attending Sir Robert Borden High School in her hometown. She acted in school plays and was a member of the drama club before moving on to study drama at the National Theatre School in Montreal, Quebec.

In her native Canada, Oh is best know for her lead performance in the Canadian film Double Happiness -- she won the Genie Award (Canada's Oscar equivalent) for Best Actress. She also appeared in the Canadian films Long Life, Happiness and Prosperity, and Last Night. The latter garnered her a second Best Actress Genie for. Oh also won an award for Best Actress at Cannes Film Festival for her role in The Diary of Evelyn Lau.

In the United States, Sandra is best known for Grey's Anatomy, but gained recognition for two recent film roles. In Under the Tuscan Sun (2003), she played a lesbian whose girlfriend was none other than Grey's co-star Kate Walsh. In 2004's critically-acclaimed Sideways, she played the scorned lover of soon-to-be-married Jack.

Her now ex-husband, Alexander Payne, directed the film. The two had a five year relationship (including two years of marriage), but divorced early in 2005. An upcoming film of Oh's is The Night Listener, where she will star along with Robin Williams and Toni Collette. But luckily for us, Grey's Anatomy remains her primary occupation.

She also starred as Rita Wu on the HBO series Arli$$, a personal favorite of some of our staff members.

Role Show

Grey's Anatomy Quotes

Amelia: I think I'm falling in love with Owen Hunt, and I'm really afraid that it's gonna destroy me.
Derek: It wouldn't be love if it didn't.

When we say things like "people don't change" it drives scientist crazy because change is literally the only constant in all of science. Energy. Matter. It's always changing, morphing, merging, growing, dying. It's the way people try not to change that's unnatural. The way we cling to what things were instead of letting things be what they are. The way we cling to old memories instead of forming new ones. The way we insist on believing despite every scientific indication that anything in this lifetime is permanent. Change is constant. How we experience change that's up to us. It can feel like death or it can feel like a second chance at life. If we open our fingers, loosen our grips, go with it, it can feel like pure adrenaline. Like at any moment we can have another chance at life. Like at any moment, we can be born all over again.

Meredith