Blue: What’s that weird smell, Pops?
Ralph Angel: I don’t smell nothing.
Blue: It’s you. You smell like stinky flowers.
Ralph Angel: It’s cologne and I think it smells good.
Blue: I think it smells funny. Maybe you put too much on.

My mother taught me to believe in what’s good. That when people say it’s too good to be true, they’re wrong.

Romero

Davis: I was moving on, new city, new career, then Nova’s book comes out.
Charley: Your problems aren’t about Nova. You took a job at a university where employees are held to a higher standard than NBA after parties.
Davis: Whatever it is, I don’t like it.
Charley: It’s called equal treatment, Davis. It feels like oppression to you because you’re used to privilege.

If you’re looking for guarantees, Davis, then you should have kept it in your pants in the first place. Do you even understand what you did, not to me but to her? Own your mistakes then maybe there might be a small chance this story could die out in a few days.

Charley

We’re finally at a place where we can sit at a table and not tear each other apart. Let’s just let that be enough because, for me, there’s no more.

Charley

Violet: It’s in me, the way he treated me. How I used to live. How I used to be. The fear. It’s still in me and you can’t protect me from that.
Hollywood: You’re right. I can’t protect you from what you’re feeling inside but what I can do is be right here with you while you’re going through it.

Ralph Angel: I chose you. I chose to be your Daddy. I chose to take care of you, help you with your homework, tuck you in bed.
Blue: What if you choose someone else one day, another boy or girl?
Ralph Angel: That will never happen as long as my heart is beating, Blue, I’m going to be your Daddy cause I chose you. You chose me too, right? Yeah, it’s all right.
Blue: Is there a part of you in me?
Darla: There is.
Blue: Because you’re my biological Mommy?
Darla: I am but even if I wasn’t I would still choose you a hundred times over just like your Daddy.

Queen Sugar Season 4 Episode 5 Quotes

Davis: I was moving on, new city, new career, then Nova’s book comes out.
Charley: Your problems aren’t about Nova. You took a job at a university where employees are held to a higher standard than NBA after parties.
Davis: Whatever it is, I don’t like it.
Charley: It’s called equal treatment, Davis. It feels like oppression to you because you’re used to privilege.

My mother taught me to believe in what’s good. That when people say it’s too good to be true, they’re wrong.

Romero