Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11 Review: Where We End Up

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All's well that ends well.

It took a life-and-death situation, but Firehouse 51 and 20 finally got past their differences on Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11 and realized they're all on the same team.

While we should be applauding a happy ending, I'm disappointed that the rivalry was wrapped up so quickly.

All - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11

As I previously mentioned, rivaling firehouses would have been a new twist on the "Big Bad" story arc.

Usually, some authority figure comes in for a few episodes and complicates things up for 51 for a while before our favorite heroes find a way to triumph over said "Big Bad."

It's a simple wash, rinse, repeat routine, and I was looking forward to something new.

However, now that the two firehouse have made peace, this storyline seems to be done for the time being.

Herrmann+Ritter - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11

Despite feeling a little -- or a lot -- rushed, there were some tense moments where it seemed like things may hit the fan.

The most obvious example was when Delaney forced 51 to move their trucks to the street.

Delaney: What do we got here?
Casey: Single-car accident. Two adults stuck inside. Engine flashed but it’s out.
Delaney: Great, thanks. I’ll take it from here.
Casey: You what?
Delaney: I appreciate the assist captain, but this is 20’s jurisdiction and has been for decades, so if you don’t mind, I’ll see it through.
Casey: Well, I do mind, actually.

It was a small, seemingly innocous request, but in reality, it was Delaney just trying to show Casey and Severide who was in charge.

Though it seemed like Delaney was just being territorial at first, it soon became clear he didn't view anyone at 51 as his equal.

Casey - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11

Not even Casey, who holds the same rank as Delaney, was worthy of being his peer.

Delaney felt that because he had more experience and years on the job than Casey and Severide that somehow made him superior.

Most people have dealt with someone not taking them seriously or giving them the respect they deserve in work environments, solely due to their gender, race, or inexperience.

The series somewhat touches upon this subject whenever a new member of 51 is introduced, but it's usually resolved rather quickly once the new person proves themself.

Severide - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11

This could have been a chance for the series to further delve into the issues surrounding experience and rank, yet it ended up being swept under the rug due to the rushed conclusion.

With things being wrapped up rather neatly, the only person from Firehouse 20 who seems to be sticking around is Violet.

For the moment Gallo swore their hookup would only be a one-time thing, viewers knew there was more to come.

And more certainly did come, as Gallo partook in a sacred rite of passage this episode: having sex in a firehouse while on shift.

Gallo - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11

Aside from this time honored tradition, things between Gallo and Violet seem to be blossoming past just sex.

Their refusal to acknowledge that their tryst is headed toward a full blown relationship is surprisingly charming, and their chemistry is off the charts.

Casey: We were in the middle of a rescue with two lives on the line. Who gives a damn about jurisdiction?
Severide: We were well within the new boundaries, chief -- part of the overlap.
Casey: ‘It’s been their territory for years,’ he said as if that gives him the right.
Boden: It doesn’t.
Casey: Exactly. It was dangerous, and it was distracting.

It's been a while since fans have gotten the chance to watch a new, somewhat "forbidden" relationship blossom, and I'm enjoying the ride.

Part of the appeal is everything that happens just seems so pure and innocent.

Boden 2 - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11

That may be a weird way to put a sexual relationship, but there's something about this pairing that just hits all the right notes.

What also hit all the right notes was the very cute, albeit brief, scene between Casey and Brett.

Though the pair's burgeoning romance is the definition of slow burn, The Powers That Be continue to give fans just enough to keep them invested.

This time around it was just the simpleness of Brett understanding what Casey needed to hear.

Brett paramedic - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 10

She knew he was beating himself up over their last call and knew just what to say to make things better.

That kind of insight isn't born from infatuation or lust but rather a real, deep-seated relationship, which is just another reason why Casey and Brett have what it takes to make an iconic couple. 

They aren't as shippable as Dawsey, but there's something genuine and true there that's worth exploring further.

Mouch - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11

Lastly, the cancer storyline, though a very real and important issue that firefighters face, just felt out of place. 

Maybe it's because viewers were just introduced to Mike Buckley this episode and had no emotional attachment to him. 

It's also possible that it fell flat because it felt like more of a public service announcement than an engaging storyline. 

Kidd: Hey Mouch. I think you owe someone an apology. Wouldn’t you agree?
Mouch: Tuesday, I’m sorry for flea shaming you. I jumped to the wrong conclusion based on a hurtful stereotype, and I hope you find it in your heart to forgive me.

This probably would have worked better if one of the characters we've known for seasons was diagnosed with cancer because he or she was exposed to some dangerous carcinogen.

However, that would have been a more involved storyline with whatever character having to battle cancer for a prolonged period of time, and that wouldn't have really worked within the tone of the series.

Kidd - Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11

Some stray thoughts:

  • Did anyone else remember Capt. Leone, also known as the rude woman who invade the women's only lounge at 51, was at Firehouse 20? I would not have recognized her if not for the episode recap at the start of the hour.

  • The subplot involving Brett, Kidd, and Foster fearing that Leone would somehow get back at them for the women's only lounge incident was one of the funnier and better fillers this season.

    Part of it's success was it built on something that happened in a previous episode while still managing to tie into the bigger storyline of the rivaling firehouses.

  • Is there an official ship name for Casey and Brett? I have no idea which, if any, of these are correct -- Casett, Bracey, Brettsey. Can someone help me out?

So what did you think Chicago Fire Fanatics?

Are you disappointed Firehouse 51 and 20 made nice so quickly?

What are your thoughts on Gallo and Violet?

Did the cancer plotline have any affect?

Don't forget to hit the comments below to let me know your thoughts. If you happened to miss the latest episode, don't worry. You can watch Chicago Fire online at TV Fanatic.

Where We End Up Review

Editor Rating: 4.1 / 5.0
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User Rating:

Rating: 5.0 / 5.0 (35 Votes)

Jessica Lerner is a staff writer for TV Fanatic. Follow her on Twitter.

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Chicago Fire Season 8 Episode 11 Quotes

Delaney: What do we got here?
Casey: Single-car accident. Two adults stuck inside. Engine flashed but it’s out.
Delaney: Great, thanks. I’ll take it from here.
Casey: You what?
Delaney: I appreciate the assist captain, but this is 20’s jurisdiction and has been for decades, so if you don’t mind, I’ll see it through.
Casey: Well, I do mind, actually.

Casey: We were in the middle of a rescue with two lives on the line. Who gives a damn about jurisdiction?
Severide: We were well within the new boundaries, chief -- part of the overlap.
Casey: ‘It’s been their territory for years,’ he said as if that gives him the right.
Boden: It doesn’t.
Casey: Exactly. It was dangerous, and it was distracting.