Downton Abbey

Sundays 9:00 PM on PBS
Downton abbey
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Rating: 4.6 / 5.0 (188 Votes)
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Recap

It's Christmas at Downton Abbey as we see both the upstairs and downstairs celebrate the special day.

With Bates on trial for murder, the holiday is especially tragic for Anna, although Mrs. Hughes refuses to let her spirits falter.

Lavinia's father is ill, and Matthew goes to his side.

Matthew asks Mary if she would like him to accompany her to Mr. Bates' trial to support Anna.

Sybil is not present at Christmas celebrations.

The staff plays with a Ouija board.

Miss Shaw, Lady Rosamund's maid, makes a stir among the servants.

Daisy tells William's father she didn't feel passionate at the same time that he did.

Violet's old friend's son is in dire financial straights, and is looking to marry Rosamund for both her charms and her fortune.

Mrs. Hughes and Miss O'Brien were called to testify against Bates, and he is found guilty and sentenced to death by hanging.

Isobel tries to talk Matthew into going after Mary.

Anna hands in her notice to keep the family from notoriety.

Mary breaks off with Richard.

Bates sentence is commuted and Anna remains at Downton.

A great ball is held for Downton Abbey.

Matthew asks Mary to be his wife.

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Episode Number:
7

Downton Abbey Season 2 Episode 7 Quotes

Richard: Why do we have to help ourselves at luncheon?
Robert: It's Downton tradition. They have our feast at luncheon and we have ours in the evening.
Richard: Well why can't they have their lunch early and they serve us, like they normally do.
Mary: Because it's Christmas day.
Richard: It's not how we'll do it at Haxsby.
Violet: Which I can easily believe.

Mrs. Hughes: I wish I could tell you not to worry.
Anna: My husband's on trial for his life, Mrs. Hughes, of course I worry.
Mrs. Hughes: Well, I'm I'd fashioned enough to believe that they can't prove him guilty, when he's not.